Investigators


This list, information, and quotes were pulled from different media sources. It has been compiled to show a quick reference to names and publicly released information about the investigators, and their beliefs about this case and how it has been handled by the Springfield Police Department.  

As stated in other places on this SFB please take into consideration how facts and quotes have been handled while looking through the list. 

Springfield MO Police Department


Officer Rick Bookout

Officer Brian Gault

Capt. Tony Glenn

Det. Richard Weter
Chief Terry Knowles
Assistant Ron Worsham
Officer Dana Carrington
Officer Ron Hutcheson
Sgt. Kevin Routh
Sgt. Dana Carrington
Sgt. Mark Webb
Det. David Asher
Det. Allen Neal
Lt. Mike Brazeal
Cpl. Doug Thomas
Prosecutor Tom Mountjoy
Sergeant Mike Owen
Mark Webb
Chief Paul Williams
FBI
Tom Den Ouden
Other
George Larbey
Darrell Moore
 

Public Media Statements By SPD
 

  • 10 Years - “There is no full-time officer assigned to the vanishing of Sherrill Levitt, Suzie Streeter and Stacy McCall”

  • 15 Years - "Investigators tell KOLR10 they still have several persons of interest in this case, but none they've pinpointed as a suspect, which is why no one was named in this report.  The department also tells KOLR10 it's been averaging one tip a month in recent years related to this case.

  • KOLR10 asked investigators if they believed this case could be solved today since technology is so much more advanced.  They say probably not because there was never any concrete evidence and no witness testimony.

  • As far as if they could have done anything better in the early days of the investigation, officers say having a better system of organization when tips came in would have helped.  They have since put a system into place where all tips go into a database for better follow up."
 
Springfield's best Confession-Getter Just Retired


Harrison Keegan, HKEEGAN@NEWS-LEADER.COM
2:16 p.m. CST February 26, 2016

Retired Springfield Police Detective Allen Neal talks about his career.

"...

Not a perfect record

As many families as Neal has been able to comfort with news that a killer had been caught, he still leaves behind many unsolved homicides.
The most high-profile of those unsolved cases is the Three Missing Women case involving the 1992 disappearances of Sherrill Levitt, Suzie Streeter and Stacy McCall.
Neal said police are up to about 30,000 pages of documents in that case and more than 5,000 leads they have followed.
"I have a lot of interviews and a lot of work into that case, and we’re still not to a conclusion," Neal said. "It would have been nice to have been able to solve that as a group prior to retirement. Hopefully in the near future that will be solved."
All good investigators, according to Neal, have an almost relentless drive to work and solve crimes, so leaving with some unsolved homicides is tough.
"That is probably the hardest thing to deal with in our work," Neal said. "You feel the pressure of solving those, and you feel like we need to solve all of them. Leaving the department with a few cold cases open, I won’t call it regret, but you wonder if there was anything we could have done to solve those."

..."


Investigator Recalls How Missing Women Case Quickly Got Out of Hand








"Overwhelmed" Video Link 
(Springfield, MO) -- Mark Webb is now the police chief in Marionville, Missouri.

In 1992, he was a young Springfield officer assigned to help investigate the case of the Three Missing Women.

He remembers how quickly the story went nationwide, and some of the abilities of local police to handle the investigation became complicated.

"Once the command of the police department realized the seriousness of this, then you had activation of federal agencies and Highway Patrol. People were being called in because you were contacting people where the people were last seen -- at the parties, there were a lot of people at the graduation party."

(Springfield, MO) -- WEB EXTRA: Mark Webb was a young officer assigned to the case in 1993. (Springfield, MO) -- Mark Webb is now the police chief in Marionville, Missouri. In 1992, he was a young Springfield officer assigned to help investigate the case of the Three Missing Women. He remembers how quickly the story went nationwide, and some of the abilities of local police to handle the investigation became complicated. "Once the command of the police department realized the seriousness of this, then you had activation of federal agencies and Highway Patrol. People were being called in because you were contacting people where the people were last seen -- at the parties, there were a lot of people at the graduation party."